Dalton’s dream teams: Simply the best

Part two of Sent Her Forward’s look back at the players who have most impressed and made me smile in best part of six years of reporting on women’s football

Deanna Cooper and Jo Wilson compete for the ball during the match between Brighton and QPR, Sep 6 2015 (Photo: Kevin Richards)

Deanna Cooper (centre) and Jay Blackie (right), two of the finest footballers I’ve seen, make both my first XIs (Photo: Kevin Richards)

I must have seen at least a dozen of those who took part in this summer’s Women’s World Cup in live club games.

Yet my selections for my Best Ever Team represent a footballing universe far broader than the game’s top global competition – or even just the Women’s Super League. Continue reading

Advertisements

Dalton’s dream teams: A few of my favourite things

A walk down Memory Lane as Sent Her Forward recalls some of the finest players I’ve had the privilege of watching

Wivelsfield Green's Leigh Farley gets in a tackle during their match against Bexhill United Reserves March 30 2014 Photo: Dave Burt

Leigh Farley scored the first goal I ever saw live in women’s football – but she did far more than that (Photo: Dave Burt)

It’s almost seven years since I began watching women’s football – and nearly six since I started reporting on it on Sent Her Forward.

Time for a list or two, I think. Continue reading

All eyes on Crawley as Arsenal and Manchester United come to town

Crawley Wasps after beating Coventry United in the FAW Cup third round, Jan 6 2018 (Photo: Ben Davidson)

Crawley Wasps beat Coventry United, leaders of the division above, to secure their fourth-round spot (Photo: Ben Davidson)

Women’s football in Sussex is set for another bumper FA Cup weekend after Super League Brighton and giant-killers Crawley Wasps landed home fourth-round ties against the mighty Arsenal and Manchester United.

And with Brighton playing their home games at Crawley Town this season, two of the biggest names in English football will be parading their skills within four miles of each other in four weeks’ time. Continue reading

Licence to thrill – but at a cost: the Super League winners and losers

Brighton celebrate winning the Preemier League play-off, May 2016 (Photo: Clive Jones)

Brighton won the Premier League Southern in 2016 and will be in WSL 1 next season (Photo: Clive Jones)

The race is on to see who can buy the best team in women’s football. 

If the creation of the Super League was a turning point in the game in England, the current upheaval represents a crucial, perhaps defining, watershed. Continue reading

Goal glut reveals gulf between Super League hopefuls and rest of Premier League

Round-up of today’s Premier League action

Action from Portsmouth v Lewes, November 26 2017 (Photo: James Prickett)

Portsmouth gained revenge for their defeat at Lewes earlier in the season (Photo: James Prickett)

The gulf between the ambitious Premier League sides still craving a Super League future and the rest was illustrated emphatically in today’s crazy scores in the league’s Southern division. Continue reading

For the love of the game: Carrie Dunn reveals what she’s learnt from a year following women’s football at close quarters

Carrie Dunn at a marketing event for her book, The Roar of the Lionesses, 2016 (Photo: Carrie Dunn)Journalist and academic Carrie Dunn has delved into areas previously unexplored in sports books, focusing on developments in a year of women’s football in England.

Dunn, a freelance writer, occasional broadcaster and journalism lecturer, has come up with an insightful account of the lives of footballers, managers, coaches and administrators in a time of great upheaval in the women’s game.

She spoke to Sent Her Forward about her hopes, fears and expectations before, during and since writing it.

Review: The Roar of the Lionesses: Women’s Football in England Continue reading

Review: The Roar of the Lionesses

Carrie Dunn with players and officials from Leyton Orient, 2016 (Photo: Carrie Dunn)

Carrie Dunn spent time with Super League teams and those who aspire to such levels, like Leyton Orient

In an age when books on sport – and football in particular – are commonplace, it’s still rare to find one that focuses on the women’s game.

The Roar of the Lionesses: Women’s Football in England won’t be the last on a subject that is gradually seeping into the consciousness of more open-minded football fans. Continue reading